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we could lessen our carbon footprint and talk about better energy use. that's perfect for us. that's what we're going to ask this challenge to present for our next improve sf challenge for the city. and that's what we'd like to engage people in. and then hopefully, some time after this challenge is announced, and if we can get the best ideas out there, we will be engaged with you to select the best answer. and if there's an idea out there that can answer that question about how to inspire people, then hopefully wq can go into november a hack-athon sponsored by green biz and others to develop an app that everyone can use. that's a great challenge. that's going to be so worthy of contributing to a goal that we've had about reducing our carbon footprint as a city. it's not just the households. once we get that data out we could look at the data from a community.re level and look at e data from a citywide level to see what we can do. i'm encouraged by that. i didn't want to give my data up to pg&e for various reasons. now iú] want to give it up for this challenge because i know people
clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and much more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich organization. we're out there rebuilding the water system. we've budget working on power generation in the country. we've been doing sewer for the city. we're looking at a brand-new rebuild of all watt systems in san francisco and we haven't had a home that's been other than mental. >> they staff over 900 people. the puc is in two office locations. >> you know, this is such a great place for a building. if the puc owned that building and we could make that the icon i can sustainable building puc represents, wouldn't be a dramatic idea? >> so, one of the major decisions we made was we wanted to make a statement with this building. we wanted this building to be a lead platinum building which is very few build
, absorb energy from the earthquake, deform, and also come back to its original geometry. what that meant was the building would be functional. it meant it wouldn't have to be abandoned and fixed. >> we have probably the greatest specification for concrete ever developed for a project that has a really innovative structural system. one of the things that's evident from the research that's been done is that concrete is responsible for a significant amount of co2 production. and that's worldwide. and we developed a way in which we could incorporate replacement material such as flag and fly ashe to supplement the portable cement and allow a big reduction in those carbon emissions associated with production from that poured cement. >> concrete for the building has a 70% replacement value with recycled materials fly ashe and recycled materials that would otherwise go to waste. reducing our carbon footprint in half. >> the way that we often do buildings in the city are often projects in the city is we go out and we do a low bid. somebody bids on something, we have to do everything that's expect
those changes for $3,000, $4,000, $5,000. they're oftentimes more energy- efficient. the general consensus is people like that. one other thing that i think is overlooked in terms of value, and i don't know of the survey talks about it, is landscaping and plants. lance camping, plants, and trees are really inexpensive compared to major remodels. i often feel it is something that is heavily overlooked. it as a lot of value. it is a touchy-really, emotional part of a property. oftentimes, we don't have front yards. maybe there should be a tree out front. maybe you should have potted plants lining the stairs going up. perhaps the rearguard in, although you never use it, doesn't matter if you don't get sunshine. plant flowers that do not need son. those are oftentimes good ways to spend money on adding value to your home. >> people that are selling their homes do need to have someone that will absolutely come in. i had a stager come in my house. you need to have another i that will absolutely have you get rid of the little things that you think make it look homey and people love it,
that the rise and shine has more energy needs for more energy than they can produce themselves, and to maintain the economic growth which they believe is essential. we observed that the south china sea is a potential source of energy supplies for china and that there is a contention among the nations in that region as to where the ownership and rights of access are to the south china sea. and this is conceivable that china might seek to reestablish its claim there by military coercion and that could lead them into a confrontation with the united states' desire to maintain free access. the best way of avoiding that military conflict is what we should see because the military conflict with china would be catastrophic for both nations, indeed for the whole region. so, we want to avoid that. i believe the best way of avoiding that is by maintaining a -- continuing to maintain a strong naval presence in the region, and by having an unambiguous commitment to doing that. i believe that our new national security strategy is that unambiguous commitment, and i believe that the u.s. navy is capable of mai
challenges. and it's challengin the best innovators in america to create radical new energy storage technology. you know, way above what we have now. this is something very powerful, to be able to keep rovers going on the moon, in mars, things that could be useful, in your cell electric vehicles, something that just is a radical leap in new technology. but i don't want to go into a lot of detail on that. you'll hear more about nasa's efforts later. and what i'm going to do1r is ge a little more background on challenge-driven innovation. and i'm going to do that just by plaijerrizing some people because it makes it a loteasier for me. i want to look at this quote, prize is a very old -- an old idea that is surprisingly powerful in our modern society. this is by a study that by mckenzie and company, back in 2010. prize is a very old idea, very powerful in our modern society. surprisingly powerful in our modern society. mckenzie also said this, 32,000, in 2010, there were 32,000no competitions, competitions, prizes, awards. that's a big number. it could be bigger but it's a big number
by the department of energy and i support thuous us chief technology officer todd park who is not the cto, but assistant to the president. >> and i'm peter hirschberg, run publicly a dozen hack-a-thon, [speaker not understood], build apps and explore what's possible. >> i'm chris, the co-founder and ceo of 100-plus and we use data from many different sources to try to help people be more healthy in their daily life. >> hi. [speaker not understood]. we're a mapping and location-based analytics platform. and we are working with open data and trying to see how we can turn data into information, data into knowledge, and the kind of decision products. >> hi, i'm john, ceo of motion loft. we're trying to understand how people move around cities and provide that data to the public to build new tools for public safety. >> hi, i'm [speaker not understood] with code for america. we're a peace core for geeks. we're trying to bring talent from the private second for and government to innovate. we work with dozens of citieses across the country and next year we should be working with san francisco whi
renewable energy resources act. >> thank you. barbara hill, assistant general manager for power. i am here today to discuss with you the way we are proposing to comply with the california renewable energy resources act. it's more commonly referred to as the rpf legislation. the act requires the puc to meet 100% of our retail sales with hetch hetchy and rps [speaker not understood] generation. what we're proposing to do is rely on our existing processes where possible and appropriate to incorporate compliance into our budgeting and financial planning process. in most years, in 83% of all years, business as usual, no extra action is necessary on the city's part to comply with this legislation. we would need to buy any additional rps supplies, 83% of the time. what i'm here today for is to get input and direction from you on our proposal to give our general manager the authority to procure rps supplies to meet any unexpected requirements when they do occur, typically in dry years or in the event of an unexpected generator outage. and to set a cost limitation for compliance, which is allowed u
energy north america and kick the program o off. that early notification period needs to meld well with the formal launch of the statutory opt out period, that's the opt out program we've talked about before that's required by the state. so we want those two components to work well together. we'll be presenting to you our key communication strategies and our overall budget, and again the proposed clean power sf timeline that factors in these changes, and in particular the early notification period concept. to given you a quick overview of the timeline, and with an emphasis on the action item for you, i'm turning to slide three, where, at this time period, we are reaching out to yourselves, to members of the board, to the mayor's office, we having the joint meeting with lafco to make sure we're really on track with the intentions from the board and the mayor, making sure that we are putting together a customer notification education plan that's supportive of your intentions. we'll be asking you to approve that plan on the 30th, in the joint meeting, and also to allow us to go forwar
happen you can get it done and i just want to thank you guys for all your energy and excitement you bring to san francisco and for the giants day in and day out. you all are the best. thank you. [cheers and applause] >> well, -- audience: romo, romo. >> well, first off congratulations san francisco. we definitely couldn't have done it without you guys. i will venture to say -- there is one thing i noticed about my team we are a great example of this city. look at the diversity of personalities, where we all come from, the different faces from different stories and we all have one goal in mine. we had one job in mine. we had one dream in mine and that is to be world series champions with this group and i am proud to say that. you guys the same thing. we couldn't have done it without you, the city of san francisco. like i said you guys better be proud. you need to be proud and i will tell you for dang sure we are all world series champions and wearing orange and black in san francisco. [cheers and applause] >> all right. now i would like to introduce two more gentlemen. the firs
process. in san francisco most of the energy is used by commercial customers. we will not be able to achieve that big beautiful build-out that we're planning without those commercial customers being put into an opt out so enough of them stay in to get the bonding ability and the economies of scale to make sure that we can do the full build out and hire the thousands of people, et cetera. thanks. >> you said that marin opt in? >> no, marin, they did their initial thing a couple of years ago. they just completed their enrollment and enrolled all of their customers a few months ago, and that included commercial customers who were then able to opt out if they wanted to. but they enrolled everybody. and i know that -- yes. >> president torres: okay. have any further comments? no? motion to assert city attorney privilege as requested. >> so moved. >> second. >> president torres: we're going to move all those in favor signify by saying aye. >> ayes. >> president torres: motion carries. let's move into closed session. >.any public comment before we o into closed session? >> i think she ha
this space with everybody. all of the beautiful courage that it takes to be up here. a lot of energy to the healing circle as well. as a juvenile, i was in juvenile hall and i went through that whole system myself. i have worked with tattoo removal, i went to other development programs. through personal experience and being raised by a single mom and being proud of my dad imprisoned and now pursuing my education, i would say there is not one answer. the answer is that there is not an answer. you have brought about by bringing this conversation forum. it is not just law enforcement perspective, it is not just the community-based perspective, it is not just the research perspective, it is a multi- layered approach. first and foremost, we do have to consider meeting youth where they are act. we are talking about perpetrators of violence or what not or system involved or involved in gangs, we have to meet them where they are at. pain and hurt produces more hurt, right? what is fundamental it is addressing back pain -- addressing that pain. not looking at folks in a punitive way and sayin
with the california clean energy fund. i know jeff anderson is here today as part of them and he's going to be partners with us, and he's partners in every branch that we doing. the first thing we're doing as clean tech sf we will establish innovation zones in san francisco. what does that mean? we asked last time when we were here in san francisco and how can we help? perhaps we can help with the resources that the city doesn't use to the highest use. let's take our space. we have a lot of assets under utilized. how can we allow the demonstrations that you're having today have a real field test for what they are, and if we could allow ourselves to be very flexible with our leases, our spaces we will allow ourselves to do that with partnership with green start and incubate some of the demonstrationos our property, let's take what we're doing specifically. with our sfpuc, with the department of the environment and melanie is here today and doing a great job with our mos connie center and i know we have a lot of panels up there already but doesn't fill all the roof tops and there i
into the small art gallery of public works. part of the energy of the venue comes from having that art gallery. having a small workshop with a few resident artists who work on art during the day. it provides a certain energy. when that moves on to the employees were working there during the night, coming in contact with patrons, you have a great start and a good experience. great talent, visuals, who have done the other thing for the most part. lots of responses. >> thank you. dmitri, while enhancing your out dope -- outdoor event, how important is the creative contact to make sure it you have customers who return over and over again? >> our creative content, you know, it is pretty out there. [laughter] >> sort of spices up the meeting. >> for us, i think the most important thing we are offering is something quintessentially san francisco. something that they cannot find anywhere else. we have two fetish fares in san francisco. there are only three other cities in the world that do that. new york, toronto, and berlin. i have been to all three and they are not nearly the same size as well we pr
and most of the energy that comes into san francisco is piped in from other places so we have to look at everything from a regional perspective. in terms of what we're doing with our infrastructure, we look at many risks to our systems to improve their reliability, both gas and electric. while we talk about earthquakes quite a bit, we look more at ground movement in general, whether it be earthquake related, land slide related, but in terms of our reliability all those risks are looked at and there's on-going efforts to increase the reliability of both the electric system and the gas system throughout the san francisco area and through the northern and system part of our state. we have hundreds of millions of dollars of pipeline replacement happening which is a major risk in a major earthquake. most people are aware in loma prieta the pipeline held pretty well but we are trying to build in a better manner to withdraw earthquakes. on the electric side, things are pretty well proat the timed already. things shut themselves off. depending on the magnitude of the earthquake, it could
to shad dee alcarra. who's-who really has been a beakon of energy inside of our office at the mayor's office and neighborhood service and is sweating through our work to make sure we are well on point to have a great celebration here at city hall and so again shad dei thank you very much for your work. to all of you here tonight from the city family i want to saw thank you for joining us here as well and to really encourage you to take part of in all of the if he istivities that we have to offer here at city hall and for those of you who have an opportunity to tine sign in at the front please do so we can reach you through the mayor's office and neighborhood services center which highlights the many services and if he is activities that occur in san francisco and in our city. and so while we take a pause, for a moment, to bring some more art into our hall, we would like to pause for one more musical enter lewd and to begin with the rest of our program. so thank you all very much. ♪ ♪ (applause). . (applause). . . >> thank you guys so much for that beautiful performance can w
're seeking not just an energy, but across the government to engage entrepreneurs and innovators across all the different sectors. for those of you familiar with the history of the health data initiative launched by then the hhs health and human services chief technology officer todd park, we sought to have a health data palooza proceeded by health data jambs or modeling sessions, jams sounded more fun, we can invite entrepreneurs in and see what can be done and created real products within a few months. that is being rolled out at education, energy, treasury, u.s. aid, other agencies as well. these programs are celebrating the use of open data and hopefully will provide some additional support. i think there are even folks here who have been part of these events. we're excited for that continued support and hope you can all join this initiative in the neutral. -- future. >> so, earlier you were talking a little about kind of how san francisco came in in terms of actually ading the officer. more broadly how do you think san francisco compares and what are some of the other cities that are d
of the port she noticed how much energy and funds were being focused on the northern waterfront and requested whether or not we could do more in the southern waterfront and i think these projects are an example of how we responded to that challenge, so monique moyer executive director. [applause] >> good morning and thank you. it is wonderful to see so many of our friends and supporters and hard workers here today. how many of you are here at heron's head for the first time? a show of hands. not many. that is terrific news. well welcome back. this is one of the greatest places in the city i am fond of saying. it's visionary. you heard about that from the mayor already and part of it is san francisco moving forward in a way that other cities just don't do. first and foremost other cities do not pass general obligation bonds of this type for a park and none for waterfront parks so we are already ahead of game that way, and we are proud of the generosity of the electoral for supporting that vision. secondly we don't have many parks and in san francisco there are a couple of open spaces bu
in criminal justice and all your energies and efforts on its behalf. we know this is an issue that is of great importance to the state of california and to the nation. of course we have the opportunity to yet again lead the way here in california. we're offering a bill this year, s.b.-1506 which would redefine the crime of simple possession of a drug from felony to misdemeanor. there are 13 other states, and the federal government which already do this and in the 13 other states, we have the data that shows that we get better results, better outcomes, meaning safer communities, and surprisingly the states include not only the large eastern states of pennsylvania and new york, but also states like mississippi, south carolina, west virginia, wyoming, iowa, all of which use this mid deem charge rather than felony. and what we find in these 13 other states is that there are higher rates of drug treatment participation, lower rates of drug use, and even slightly lower rates of violent and property crime. so again, we can prove we can have safer communities. and then of course there are the unintend
happier. and the owners have incurred quite a bit of expense just through this process, time and energy, and raising up the fence would be a cost issue for them to be honest. >> commissioner moore. >> mr. lindsay, don't we have a restriction or code about height of fence between adjoining properties? i think it has to be at a certain height; is that correct? >> this would be in the required rear yard of this property. >> yes. >> the height is limited to 10 feet. >> since the patio is so small, though, i think the ability of having it feel more like part of the sky given the parking lot is behind, a much more desirable patio environment. i also do not believe a solid fence is the right response here because from the parking lot, this looks more like a garden and it should not look like a rear wall of some whatever. so, i think the proper garden treatment of the fence i think is important from the inside as well as from the outside looking back. i thought the presentation was sensitive to the details you have in order to fully respond to the neighbors' concerns. i think the distance from
was an alliance between environmentalists and labor and promote green energy and other activities and he brought all of this to the college board when he came. he brought me on, as i said to be a warrior, to fight the corruption, the lack of transparency, and other horrible things that were going on at the time, and after things got going we worked together on some projects of policy. he had an idea to create a sustainability plan that was not going anywhere for a while, but we worked together on that and we passed it, and it's really a great plan. it's an environmental model, i have to say. he brought a sunshine policy. we worked together in passing a sunshine policy. you have no idea how hard this was. everyone was opposed to it. it took a year, but we finally got it through, and he was persistent. we would meet about it and after i would say "i don't know milton. this doesn't look like it's going anywhere" and he would say "no. we're going to do this. we're going to do this" and he was right. he was a real reformer. he kept pushing and pushing in his quiet way. one of the things
dad" and milton loved this. he loved this energy and out of most of us and showed in what he ended up doing. all three kids learned at an early age giving to other people was one of the main things we were put on this world to do. our mom and dad taught us that. milton
. keep? energy bars. dry food. canned vegetables. can corn, can peas, you can drain that and drink the water and eat the vegetables. buy can food that you eat normally. and a can opener. first aid kit, have 3. have you a small one in the car, have a nice sized one for home and make sure you have one at work. make sure if you are a diabetic or have a heart condition, something that you normal take have a little supply. have a storage area for this. consider this. if you have a supply kit, make sure you have one that's mobile. mobile meaning, if you have to evacuate a square mile for disaster or terrorist or anything, have it in there with you in case you are on your own for a bit. you might not be in your home. you might be somewhere else. there's a tsunami coming in. if you have kids at home what do you keep for them? make sure you keep them entertained and have food they like. the most useful tool in a disaster? scissors. if you use clothes you will be cold. [inaudible]. duct tape. many uses. you want garbage bags. line the toilet with trash bags. you want to line it, line it up
when you do not have the energy anymore? that scared of a piece of blank paper and a collection coming up in six weeks -- that does not scare you? >> yes, but i tried to protect myself. for example, i go to a flea market, and nt place. when i see something that i find interesting, even if i have no interest in anything at the moment, i say that one day i will do something from that. i know that there was work on it. i think i have to burn it, because at the end, i take too much time to look at it. but, yes, i mean, to be honest, i think will realize what time that i have no more of the passion, which will mean i will stop. i think it is better. honestly, before i was doing that profession, because i was not at peace with the fact that i was rejected, so i was inventing a lot of things. at the moment, i started to work -- i finish. because i do the things that i'd love to do, why should i live now. there's no reason to lie? because i am accepted through my work? why should i lie? because i do not want to live again in my old days. but i will always interested in fashion. >> the n
of the system is fed by gravity, without the use of energy-consuming pumps. valves open to regulate the flow into the 85-mile-long delaware aqueduct -- the longest tunnel in the world. at hillview reservoir... the water is partitioned into another giant tunnel system. where it travels deep below manhattan. the pressure built up by gravity from the mountains pushes the water upwards toward the surface through vertical shafts. these shafts feed the water mains of each neighborhood, which branch into smaller pipes below the streets... feeding into buildings and houses, into the plumbing, and finally, after its long journey, to our faucets. providing water to homes and industry is a monumental task, requiring immense infrastructure. but once the water is delivered and used, it must also be taken away. man: it's important that the waste generated by any society not be left around. cholera, and other diseases and problems, have been spread, because people wound up living in filth. even the ancients understood that you couldn't have the sewage where you lived. and the easiest thing to do was transp
intellectually, i made up for in energy. i intervened on the basis that he was a child that had been subjected to incredible abuse. he was very much a kid and the child welfare system. it happens too many violent youth. i intervened, and he was never prosecuted. he was 14 years old, he was put into what would be thought of now has a psychiatric facility. it was a child psychiatric facility. he underwent all kinds of treatment, training, came out, went back to school. it really went through recovery. and then graduated high school, went to community college, and i would like someone to guess what profession he wound up going into. law enforcement. he was not with the lapd. he was with a smaller police department for 30 years. he has since retired. he has been married twice. he has raised four children. he has lived an extraordinary life. i am grateful for having had him in my life as a guidepost. i do think it is the ultimate irony that he turned out to be a police officer. >> we have some other questions. very good questions. we do not have much time. i work at san quentin prison. they segrega
. let's go prop b, let's go joe d. thank you so much. [ applause ] >> all right, is there high-energy today? fantastic. a couple of other colleagues, peers in the city family, tom, who is our arts commission executive director. thank you for joining us. we have a partnership in the arts commission that every new building has public art. i don't know if our artist for north beach is here, bill fontana, we're excited about his work and the opportunity to have beautiful art as part of the project. so bill, thank you. also, we talked about how important access is to our neighborhood libraries and today we have our acting director in the mayor's office of disability, carla johnson. carla. thank you for joining us. thank you for being here today. [ applause ] our next supervisor who also does not need much of an introduction because he is at every single library opening. a terrific staunch supporter and advocate for public libraries supervisor scott wiener. thank you for joining us [ applause ] . >> thank you, luis and congratulations on this great day moving forward. i go to library ope
and it was raining and horrible and saying "will you vote for my dad" and milton loved this. he loved this energy and out of most of us and showed in what he ended up doing. all three kids learned at an early age giving to other people was one of the main things we were put on this world to do. our mom and dad taught us that. milton was a true believer sometimes to his detriment and would take on any power he needed to be even if it meant being fired from the board and "you're not doing enough. you're not raising enough money". he would take on anyone anytime if it was the right thing to do. he felt so strongly things needed to be resolved at city college and he never stop fighting after being diagnosed and surgery and he went to the meetings. he was a true believer and wanted to make it a better educational facility. many of his friends who are here and they would agree if you wanted someone in your corner you wanted milton. and there was a question that he had a temper and he did not and we had a bully in our neighborhood that was beating me up and milton made it clear physically that
, the people, everything. it is like everyone has so much energy. >> hey, you are beautiful. and i love you. >> why? because... it is definitely a lot more fun than being inside. >> so far we have had zero problems. it is a long-step process, a lot of thinking and people involved. so we think that we got rid of all of the problems that could happen. they are doing it, and we are doing it and everybody is doing the best that they can. >> it is a wonderful out reach >> come. >> it is beautiful. ♪ >> we are here at j.c. plumbing. you are going to show was plumbing fixtures. >> yes, we are. very excited to have you. >> let's look at fixtures and faucets and accessories. it is going to be very exciting here. please join us for "bluilding sf." joining janessa and i today is andre. thanks for coming. we have had some great times in the past with some of these shows. you have been kitchen and bath in the past. >> i'm an architect. i do a lot of construction work. or >> do people look for when they do a bathroom remodels? >> that is a good question. kitchens are the ultimate and social room, while
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 72 (some duplicates have been removed)

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